Clay City

Clay City Was Founded by Barbara STORM

CLAY CITY, the principal center of population and trade in the south end of the county, in Harrison Township, eighteen miles south of Brazil by railroad. This place was founded in 1873, by Barbara STORM, at the terminus of the Terre Haute & Southeastern Railroad, twenty-six miles southeast of Terre Haute. The location of Clay City was more an accident; or circumstance, than a forethought. While the Terre Haute & Cincinnati Railroad (as it was then named) was in process of building no one thought of a town-site at this point. A stake had been driven, by agreement, at a point on the Henry COOPRIDER land, between the Storm place and Middlebury, to which the road was to be built and a station maintained. The Terre Haute City Council had made an appropriation of $100,000 to aid in the building of the road, which, by the terms of the donation, was to be expended on the first twenty-six miles of construction, the distance, as then thought, from Main street, Terre Haute, to Middlebury, or the point at which the stake had been driven, marking the ground for the station. But the terminus of the twenty-six miles as measured by the company’s survey was at the road crossing by the “old red mill.” Here track laying ceased. The end of the run was on the STORM place, but no town-plat was laid out until nearly a year later. For nearly eight years this was the terminus of the road, the town meanwhile building up, which was originally platted and known as Markland. For a time, however, it was better known as “The Y,” the railroad company having laid switch capacity of this figure for reaching the WOODRUFF & TRUNKY Coal Mine and for the turning of trains. Colonel MARKLAND, in whose honor the town-site had been named, was an Indianaian who rendered his country service both in the military and the civil capacity. When application was made to the department for a post office another had, meanwhile, been established within the state bearing the name of Markland. Morton C. HUNTER, who then represented this district in Congress, assumed to name the office Huntersville, and to have his brother’s wife, Mrs. Charles HUNTER, appointed postmistress. This act on the part of Representative HUNTER, who was not in very savory odor with his constituency hereabout, proved very dis-satisfactory and was resented by the calling of an indignation meeting, held at BURGER‘s store, which was largely attended, when a committee was appointed to select a suit-able name for the office, who reported “Clay City,” which was approved, and subsequently the name of the town made to conform thereto. Though the name was seemingly appropriate, it proved a source of confusion and vexation in the service for months thereafter, owing to an office of the same name in Clay County, Illinois. Mail addressed to either office was liable to be sent to the other, giving rise to annoyance and delay in delivery. But the change was made by the department and Pius M. LONG appointed postmaster.

The attorneys at law who have been located and have practiced here may be enumerated as follows: John T. GARDNER, William V. BURNS, Frank A. HORNER, Watt C. ELKIN, Alexander McGREGOR, W. S. ZENOR, W. W. McGREGOR, Henry HOCHSTETLER, S. W. JARVIS, George W. WILTSE, G. S. PAYNE, William C. WILTSE, Zeph KELLER, B. V. GOSHORN, Herbert REYNOLDS, O. H. HAYDEN. John T. GARDNER is now the oldest attorney in points of residence and practice here.

The individuals and firms who have done business at this place in the various channels of “trade and commerce” during the practically thirty-seven years of its history number many more than any one would be ready to believe at first mention and thought along this line. About all branches of mercantile pursuits have been represented-dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, clothing, hardware implements, notions, drugs and medicines, confections, millinery, etc., etc. The following enumeration comprises all that can be recalled from recollection:

ACKELMIRE, & CompanyALLEE, Mrs. Clementine

AULD, Smith F.

BAKER & ROW

BARCUS, Miss Angie

BARCUS,  …

BARKER, William I.

BAUMGARTNER, Wm. F.

BENCE, J. H.

BENCE & BROWN

BLACK Brothers

BONHAM

BRENTON, John W.

BROSIUS Co.

BROTHERS, Frank & William

BROTHERS, Damer

BRYSON, R.

BURGER, Brothers

BURGER, M. S.

BURGER & TERRY

CASTANG, L. G.

COOK &  HOLLAND

COOPRIDER, Eli

COOPRIDER & FULKERSON

CROMWELL, D. T.

CUMMINS Brothers

DANHOUR, J. W.

DELLAFIELD & Son

DOROTHY, F. M.

DOROTHY, Mrs. Natalena

DUNCAN, W. C.FESTER, C. C.

FLESHMAN, John

FULKERSON, A. J.

GOSHORN & ROW

GRABER Brothers

GRAFE, John

GRIFFITH Brothers

GRISMER, H. & Company

HALE & Company

HARRIS, N. A.

HAYS, John W.

HYATT, James F.

HYATT, H. H.

HYATT & LONG

INGRAM & JOHNSON

JENSON, Martin

JETT, M. L.

KAYSER, Geo. J

KAYSER  & BLACK

KESTER, John W.

KILMER, & Son

KNOX, Charles

LIEBER, Joseph

LONG, Harrison J.

LONG & Son

LONG, W. H.

MARKLE, George

McCONNELL & CONLEY

MIDDLEMAS, D. C.

MUEHLER & NOTTERNATTKEMPER, Charles

PINNEY, Ovid

Mrs. REED & LONG

SADLER, S. C.

SCHAUWECKER & CRABTREE

SCHAUWECKER  & Son

SEIGEL, Charles

SMITH & RADER

SMITH & SCHAEFER

STORM Brothers

TRAVIS & TRAVIS

TRAVIS & OBERHOLTZER

VIAL, John B.

WARNER, William I.

WATTS, F. C.

WEAVER, Miss Lou

WHITE, Joseph

WHITE, Samuel

WHITESELL, C. A.

WILBUR, Joseph C.

WILEY, John T.

WILSON & MORRIS

WILTSE, William C.

WITTY, James H

WITTY, A. L.

WOOLLEN, John

YUNG, Fred

ZENOR, Marshall